Notes for BA English : The Huntsman, Explanation

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The Huntsman:

Edward Lowbury:

Explanation lines (1-6):

Reference: These lines have been taken from the poem ‘ The Huntsman’ written by Edward Lowbury.

Context: The poet describes the cause of death of the hunter whose skull was in the forest. Kagwa, a hunter, found a skull in a forest. He told the king. The king asked his guards to go with Kagwa and verify his words. The guards searched the talking skull but didn’t find. When they found, the skull didn’t speak and Kagwa died by guards.

Explanation:

Kagwa was a brave hunter of lions; he used to hunt in the dense forest. He killed the lion with his spear. As usual, Kagwa was ion hunting trip, he found a skull of the man. He was surprised to see the skull. He questioned the skull about its presence. The skull replied that talking brought it here. Kagwa was astonished to find the skull.

In fact, ‘The Huntsman’ is a folk-lore (tradition). Its basic structure has been taken from the Kenyan folk-lore. The hero, Kagwa, thinks it a great fortune to find the skull but it is said, ‘Man purposes and God disposes’.

Explanation lines (7-12):

Reference: The same as above:

Context: The same as above:

Explanation:

After watching the skull Kagwa was determined to get the reward from the king. Kagwa went home and consulted his family members. He hurriedly went to the king, and informed him of every thing. After listening, the king was amazed and could not believe it. He neither watched nor heard such a skull in his whole life.

 The poet has used great irony in this poem to make it more effective. Kagwa is assured to obtain prize from the king. But irony of fate is working against him.

Explanation lines (13-18):

Reference: The same as above:

Context: The same as above:

Explanation:

In the third extract, the poet is using fatal irony. Every thing goes against the expectation of Kagwa. The king called his two guards and deputed them to go with Kagwa. If Kagwa’s tale proves lie, he will be killed at once.

Actually, fate sometimes plays a different role than a man desires. There is a great irony in this extract.

Explanation lines (19-24):

Reference: The same as above:

Context: The same as above:

Explanation:

Kagwa and the tow guards want in the forest on horses. They searched the skull for many days but could not fiend it. After much effort they succeeded in searching, the skull. Kagwa requested the skull to speak but ended in smoke. Kagwa implored the skull to speak but all in vain. He repeatedly implored but it proved cry in a desert. There is a great use of suspense in this extract. Kagwa doesn’t know what will happen?

Explanation lines (25-30):

Reference: The same as above:

Context: The same as above:

Explanation:

 When the skull spoke nothing, Kagwa was killed by the guards with the sword and huntsman about his arrival. Kagwa replied that talking brought him here. “Silence is Gold”, it is an established maxim. Kagwa could not take care of the important of silence.

It is said, “Think before you speak and look before you leap”. In a nut-shell, the unfortunate death of Kagwa is great irony.

2 Responses

  1. can i have ‘link’ about edward lowbury in detail please? :

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